Snes Game Cheats Code

PC Game Cheats And Cheat Codes Did you know that by learning to use PC game cheats and cheat codes you can take your video gaming skills to the next level, and the next level, and beyond! So why not take advantage of these secret game cheats and codes and get the edge over your competition.

When I first play a new game I try to figure the game out the best I can, but when push comes to shove I go looking for game cheats. By reading and memorizing some of the cheat codes for the game I’m playing, I can usually get that extra little advantage I need to win.

Sometimes it may not seem like much, but it’s amazing how much difference it can make in the course of a game. Maybe I can get some more ammo here, or improve the life of a character there, or even get a brand new life. Whatever the case may be, I use PC game cheats to make my game a little stronger.

Something else that I really like to do is to rent a video game before I decide to buy it. That way I can check it out before I go ahead and buy. Doing this keeps me from spending good money on a game I don’t like.

My favorite video game rental company gives me just about everything I want to know about a game before I rent or buy it. I can look at cheat codes, videos, trailers, screenshots, user reviews, critic reviews, faqs and walkthroughs for any PC game I’m interested in.

Maybe you should take a look at the snes Game Cheats http://snesguy.com/list-snes-game-cheats-letter.html available at my favorite online game store before leaving this page. It won’t cost you a dime to look, and you just might see a game you’d like to rent , Click here while you’re there.

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Best Villiam is a danish based musician

Villiam is a danish based musician, composer and producer, best known for his productions and releases on the label Stereomusic.dk.

He started playing the piano at the age of 4, and at the age of 7 he participated in a music competition at the royal Danish academy of Music.

In 2013 Villiam started the label Stereomusic.dk, which publishes the music that Villiam has either composed, produced or has been involved in.

Villiams cooperation with Hyldgaard resulted in 3 published songs, in which the song “Tonight” stayed on the Chartbase Top-100 for 10 weeks, peaking as no. 30 on the list. This song was followed up by the song “I Want You” and later on the song “Dance in the dark” i 2015.

In 2015 Villiam Published 4 songs in the band “Head Over Heels”, together with Karolina Ahlberg Bolander.

In 2016 the songs “Chemistry” and “Freakin Freakin Friday” were released with 2 various co-artists.

In 2017 the song “One More Time” was released in July featuring “Inca”.

Link Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/artist/1xWixHg5h6wbYgszrSXxEh?si=FJP4_IjJSN276inFaxk1Gw

Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1UAURo_Uuo2aSMwfMeHDAw

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3 Packable Protein Shakes – Articles

We love the ease of a protein shake, how long we feel satisfied and the way it curbs our cravings. But when you’re on the go or traveling, it’s not always easy — especially when you don’t have access to a blender. That’s why our current obsession is blender bottle shakes. They are so easy to make and take when you’re on the go, even on a vacay or a work trip. Plus, no blender clean-up, which is a bonus in our book.

To make these shakes truly easy to pack and travel with, add ingredients to a sealable bag and pack into your blender bottle. You can literally prep and pack your shakes for the week in 5 minutes, and all you’ll need to do to make them is add water and shake in your blender bottle.   

 

CHOCOLATE NUT SHAKE

Ingredients

Nutrition
Calories: 321 | Fat: 14g | Sugar: 1g | Carbs: 17g | Fiber: 8g | Protein: 34g 

 

COLD BREW SHAKE

Ingredients 

Nutrition
Calories: 245 | Fat: 6g | Sugar: 3g | Carbs: 22g | Fiber: 9g | Protein: 31g 

 

CINNAMON ROLL SHAKE 

Ingredients 

Nutrition
Calories: 219 | Fat: 5g | Sugar: 1g | Carbs: 15g | Fiber: 7g | Protein: 30g 

 

There are many different ways to make a blender bottle shake, especially if you get creative with your powders and extracts. Have an idea to pack your shakes or another tasty version of a blender shake? Email us at coachanika@lifetime-weightloss with your ideas.

 

Written by LTWL Staff    

 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader. 

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5 Workouts for Travelers – Articles

A common question that I (and other personal trainers) get from clients is, “What workouts can I do during a vacation or while traveling for work?” If that’s something you’ve been looking for, too, I’ve shared workout ideas below. You can use them the next time you go away for a few days or a week based on the equipment you have access to. 

The workouts will progress from exercises where you won’t need equipment (body weight only), to light equipment that you can easily bring with you on a trip (e.g., resistance bands), to workouts that you can do with equipment that can be found at most hotel gyms (dumbbells, adjustable bench, etc.). Let’s get started!

 

1.  O U T D O O R  R E C O V E R Y  W O R K 

Believe it or not, this is usually my number one suggestion for most clients and fitness enthusiasts when they go on vacation (assuming they have been training reasonably hard for 3 to 4 days per week for 8 to 12 weeks).

Vacations are usually a nice time to get some much-needed active recovery time during the year. I generally suggest 2–4 weeks per year spread out in one-week increments during each quarter. It’s a good time to get outside and focus on increasing steps with a Movement Tracker like a Vivosmart (my personal favorite) and getting some fresh air.

 

2.  Z O N E – S P E C I F I C  C A R D I O

If you need to do a little more than walking outside (as discussed in the first workout option), doing Zone-Specific Cardio outside (or inside if your hotel has cardio equipment) is another idea that works nice for work-related trips or vacations. 

In addition to using one of the movement trackers suggested, using a workout app, like the one on the Life Time website, can be your “trainer on the road” telling you to speed up or slow down. This can be even more effective if you’ve completed an ActiveMetabolicAssessment℠ and Virtual Metabolic Coaching, as these workouts are specifically designed to your metabolism and the time you have available to do cardio.

 

3.  B O D Y W E I G H T  E X E R C I S E S

Exercises using bodyweight, like squats, lunges, push-ups, crunches and burpees, can allow for a fun and effective workout. If you are new to working out, you can do the following exercises as straight sets (do the required amount of sets, reps, rest and repeat).

I suggest doing 15–20 reps and 2–3 sets of each exercise and resting for 30–45 seconds. Advanced exercise enthusiasts can do the exercises as a circuit (a set of each exercise done with minimal rest until all 6 exercises are finished). Repeat for 2 to 3 circuits or try to do as many “rounds” as possible in a given time period, such as 20 minutes. 

 

SQUAT

  • Stand with your feet positioned at shoulder width
  • Bend your knees and hips simultaneously, and sit down and back (pretend there is a chair behind you)
  • Once your hips are in line with your knees, extend your knees and hips simultaneously back to the starting position

PUSH-UP

  • Lie on the floor in a prone position with your hands in line with your shoulders
  • With either your knees (beginner) or toes (advanced) on the floor and keeping your core tight, push yourself away from the floor by simultaneously extending your elbows and shoulders
  • Keeping your core tight, lower yourself to the floor by simultaneously bending your elbows and shoulders

LUNGE

  • Place your feet next to one another in a standing position
  • Step forward with one foot and lower your hips by bending your hip and knee simultaneously
  • Push your body back to the starting position by extending your hip and knee joint simultaneously
  • Repeat steps with the opposite foot

CRUNCH

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent, and place your hands by your ears with your elbows out to the side
  • Inhale through your nose and, while exhaling through the mouth, bring your ribs and hips together by lifting your shoulders off the mat by contracting your abdominal muscles
  • Inhale through your nose and lower your shoulders back to the mat by relaxing your abdominal muscles

BRIDGE

  • Lie down on your back with your knees bent and arms off to the side
  • While keeping your core engaged, lift your hips off the floor until your shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line
  • Lower your hips back down in a controlled manner

BURPEE

  • Simultaneously squat down and place your hands on the floor
  • Kick your feet back and bring your body into a plank position
  • Jump your feet back between your hands and stand up to the starting positon

 

4.  B O D Y W E I G H T  +  R E S I S T A N C E  B A N D

As nice as the bodyweight exercises featured in option 3 are, unfortunately there are muscle groups that don’t get targeted (e.g., back, biceps, etc.). A good way to take the bodyweight exercise workout up a notch is to add a Resistance Band. This piece of equipment is very light and easily fits in any suitcase or travel bag. You can do the same exercises as above, but add the two additional exercises below with a Resistance Band.

You can continue with the same sets, reps and rest suggested in the last workout (15–20 reps and 2–3 sets of each exercise and resting for 30–45 seconds). And follow the same suggestions as above for an advanced worked. 

 

TRICEPS KICKBACK

  • With a resistance band firmly anchored to a door, piece of equipment, etc., grab the handles and step back until there is tension on the band
  • Lean forward to a 45-degree angle with your palms facing back, and pull your elbows up and back
  • Contract your triceps and extend your arms until they are straight
  • Relax your triceps and bend your elbows until they are back in the starting position

ROW

  • With a resistance band firmly anchored to a door, piece of equipment, etc., grab the handles and step back until there is tension on the band
  • With your palms down and elbows out, simultaneously bend your shoulders and elbows, pull your elbows back focusing on squeezing the back muscles
  • Simultaneously extend your shoulders and elbows back to the starting position

 

5.  H O T E L  G Y M  W O R K O U T 

Finally, some person will want to work out indoors. If you are staying in a decent hotel, there is a good chance it has a small gym of some kind. Most hotel gyms usually have a couple pieces of cardio equipment (treadmill, elliptical, bike, etc.), dumbbells (that go in 5-lb. increments up to 50 lb.), exercise mats and an adjustable bench. This last workout will mainly use dumbbells as equipment and is listed below.

 


I hope this article gave you plenty of ideas based on your goals and the equipment you have access to.  Remember there are options for everyone, so happy travels! I’m also including descriptions for all the exercises below in case you need additional guidance.

 

In health, Corey Grenz — Program Specialist and Master Trainer, Life Time, Chanhassen

 

E X E R C I S E  D E S C R I P T I O N S 

 

Bodyweight Squat

  • Stand with your feet positioned at shoulder width
  • Bend your knees and hips simultaneously, and sit down and back (pretend there is a chair behind you)
  • Once your hips are in line with your knees, extend your knees and hips simultaneously back to the starting position

 

Push-Up 

  • Lie on the floor in a prone position with your hands in line with your shoulders
  • With either your knees (beginner) or toes (advanced) on the floor and keeping your core tight, push yourself away from the floor by simultaneously extending your elbows and shoulders
  • Keeping your core tight, lower yourself to the floor by simultaneously bending your elbows and shoulders

 

Forward Lunge 

  • Place your feet next to one another in a standing position
  • Step forward with one foot and lower your hips by bending your hip and knee simultaneously
  • Push your body back to the starting position by extending your hip and knee joint simultaneously
  • Repeat steps with the opposite foot

 

Abdominal Crunch 

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent, and place your hands by your ears with your elbows out to the side
  • Inhale through your nose and, while exhaling through the mouth, bring your ribs and hips together by lifting your shoulders off the mat by contracting your abdominal muscles
  • Inhale through your nose and lower your shoulders back to the mat by relaxing your abdominal muscles

 

Bridge 

  • Lie down on your back with your knees bent and arms off to the side
  • While keeping your core engaged, lift your hips off the floor until your shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line
  • Lower your hips back down in a controlled manner

 

Burpee (Basic with no Push-Up) 

  • Simultaneously squat down and place your hands on the floor
  • Kick your feet back and bring your body into a plank position
  • Jump your feet back between your hands and stand up to the starting positon

 

Resistance Band Triceps Kickback 

  • With a resistance band firmly anchored to a door, piece of equipment, etc., grab the handles and step back until there is tension on the band
  • Lean forward to a 45-degree angle with your palms facing back, and pull your elbows up and back
  • Contract your triceps and extend your arms until they are straight
  • Relax your triceps and bend your elbows until they are back in the starting position

 

Resistance Band Row 

  • With a resistance band firmly anchored to a door, piece of equipment, etc., grab the handles and step back until there is tension on the band
  • With your palms down and elbows out, simultaneously bend your shoulders and elbows, pull your elbows back focusing on squeezing the back muscles
  • Simultaneously extend your shoulders and elbows back to the starting position

 

Dumbbell Goblet Squat 

  • Hold dumbbell against your chest in a “goblet” position and place your feet so they are shoulder width
  • Bend your knees and hips simultaneously, and sit down and back (pretend there is a chair behind you)
  • Once your hips are in line with your knees, extend your knees and hips simultaneously back to the starting position

 

Dumbbell Flat Bench Chest Press 

  • Grab 2 dumbbells, lie on your back on a bench and bring the dumbbells to your armpit crease
  • Contract your chest muscles and extend your shoulders and elbows simultaneously, bringing the dumbbells close together
  • Let the dumbbells come back to the starting position by bending your shoulders and elbows simultaneously

 

Dumbbell Forward Lunge 

  • Same steps as the bodyweight forward lunge except you are holding dumbbells

 

Dumbbell 1-Arm Row 

  • Grab a dumbbell and place the opposite knee and hand on the bench so your hips, shoulders and ears are in a straight line
  • Contract your back muscles and pull the dumbbell to your stomach by bending your shoulder and elbow simultaneously
  • Lower the dumbbell back to the starting position in a controlled manner by extending your shoulder and elbow simultaneously

 

Dumbbell Romanian Deadlift 

  • Grab 2 dumbbells and stand with your feet close together with your knees in a soft position
  • Hinge at your hips by pushing them back and letting the dumbbells glide down in a straight line while keeping your back straight
  • Bring your hips forward and extend your body until you are in the starting position

 

Dumbbell Biceps Curl 

  • Grab 2 dumbbells and let them hang off to your side with your palms facing forward while in a narrow stance
  • Squeeze your biceps, bend your elbows and bring the dumbbells towards your shoulders
  • Relax your biceps, extend your arms and lower the dumbbells in a controlled manner

 

Dumbbell Flat Bench Triceps Extension 

  • Grab 2 dumbbells, lie on your back on a bench and extend your arms with your palms facing
  • Slowly bend your elbows and bring the dumbbells towards the side of your head
  • Contract your triceps and extend your arms bringing the dumbbells back to the starting position

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Questioning if you have food sensitivities?  – Articles

If, while I was getting my dietetics degree, you would have told me that I’d be coaching person about food sensitivities, I honestly would have thought you were joking.

When I was in college (and during my medical internship), gluten-free was a thing we only talked about when someone had diagnosed celiac disease. Peanut allergies were definitely on the rise (as were peanut and nut-free schools), and I was under the impression that every American should be consume three servings of milk (cow dairy) per day.

Flash forward to today, and food sensitivities (and not just food allergies) are definitely a thing. There are hundreds of books that take users through elimination diets, foods that are heavily marketed as gluten-free, and nut-based milk alternatives that are now one of the hottest growing category in the grocery store.

Also, person are getting tested for food sensitivities more than ever before. They’re finding out whether there are certain foods their bodies are reacting to so they can feel better, lose weight and reduce joint pain. It’s actually the number one lab test that we offer at Life Time. 

But why are food sensitivities on the rise now? 

Here’s the thing; there are a lot of opinions on this topic. What I get most excited about is the continued and emerging research on gut health, and the changes happening to our immune systems. 

One thing to note, and what I always tell clients, is that food has changed. The running joke in this industry is that our grandparents (and the generations before) didn’t have to buy organic because everything was organic.

But today, our food is more processed, and much more likely to be contaminated by pesticides and herbicides, and include xenoestrogens, genetically modified ingredients, hormones, antibiotics, etc., which all can impact something we call gut integrity.

Visualize all of the foreign and artificial gunk being digested (and absorbed) by your body. All of that stress can create a more permeable gut lining, which makes us more vulnerable to the different proteins in foods we are trying to digest and absorb.

Even worse, chronic stress, personal products (lotions, makeup, etc.) and our toxic environment (pollution, plastics, etc.) can all create additional havoc for that same gut lining. 

 

M Y   S T O R Y

I started dealing with food sensitivities while I was in college, and I didn’t even know it. Diagnosed with IBS (I even wrote an article about it after my positive experience, which you can read here), I felt limited in my options to find relief. My doctor gave me a prescription for Miralax and told me to watch my stress, and I just did my best to deal with the pain and constipation. 

When I started working at Life Time in 2008, I was introduced to a naturopathic physician who recommended that I go gluten-free and take specific supplements to help support my gut lining. It changed my life.

I went from daily stomachaches (sometimes debilitating) and irregularity to feeling amazing within a few short weeks. The acne on my face cleared up, and my bowel movements became regular (and non-strenuous). Coming from a family with several females dealing with the same stomach issues as me, I became a huge fan of gluten-free, recommending it to everyone I knew that struggled with IBS. And it changed their lives, too.

I suppose when you start seeing relief from something so non-traditional, you start digging in and researching more. I found myself reading more information on different signs and symptoms of varying food sensitivities, specifically cow dairy. I learned from other holistic practitioners that when they took dairy away, clients dealing with acne and sinus infections (two things I often dealt with) started to find relief.

When having these conversations with clients, I often hear recollections of a childhood free of food sensitivities and not knowing of even one person with a full-blown peanut allergy. So I understand that sometimes this information is hard to hear or understand. But the prevalence of person feeling better after removing certain foods is too hard to ignore. 

It’s been over 7 years since I fully eliminated gluten (and mostly eliminated cow dairy). When these things sneak into my diet, I always feel it — most often in my joints. But it’s something I’ve committed to because I feel so much better without gluten and dairy. It’s also why I’m super passionate about our D.TOXSM program. It’s founded on an elimination diet that takes out the most common food sensitivities. And person feel so amazing after the program that they continue eating that way. 

One other thing I have to continue to check in on is my stress. I’m an “internalizer,” so I have to periodically assess stress and whether it’s impacting my gut/immune health. Recently I did our full lab test panel and found out I was starting to react to new food proteins, predominately egg yolks and yeast. I’m currently eliminating those foods (not eating eggs is hard for me) and adding in some additional gut-support supplements and, of course, monitoring and managing my stress better. 

 

W H A T   I   R E C O M M E N D

If you are thinking that food sensitivities might be an issue for you, there are three options I would suggest as starting points. 

1. CONSIDER AN ELIMINATION DIET. 

It’s something I was putting clients on before Life Time began offering an actual test. I like it because it’s a low barrier and something you can try for a shorter period of time. As I stated above, the D.TOX program eliminates the most common foods that create inflammation and cause sensitivities: wheat/gluten, cow dairy, corn, soy, peanuts and eggs. And we’ve had hundreds of thousands of person go through the program and find success.

2. IF YOU’RE READY TO FIND ANSWERS — TEST. 

Although elimination diets rule out the big sensitivities, everyone is different. You could be reacting to a protein in food that isn’t one of the 5 most common sensitivities. Or maybe you’ve tried an elimination diet and it was hard to confirm which food or foods were problematic. Or maybe you need to see it on paper before you will change or fully commit. We all know ourselves and what will work best or motivate us. 

Now there are a number of food sensitivity tests out there; some are nice, some not so nice. I’ve gone through just about all of them, and I can say they all have their limitations. The one we offer, and that I point person to, comes with an additional blood assessment panel (to gain more insight to overall digestive health) and, even more importantly, a full review from one of our corporate registered dietitians. Our dietitians will tell you what the results mean (and what they don’t), and give you the next steps to take with your eating, training and supplements. Think of it as a nice starting point, knowing that the guidance and one on one time with the dietitian will be the key to understand what to do next. These steps will be unique to your results and lead you down the right path to get to your goal. Our test isn’t offered in all states, but if you are a member and are above 18, you can click here to learn more or even purchase.  

3. TRY GUT-SUPPORTING SUPPLEMENTS. 

Eliminating problem foods is always step one, but if you’re not ready for that, in the meantime you can still take nutrients to help support your gut lining. My suggestions are:

  • Probiotics (to help populate good flora in your intestinal tract),
  • Glutamine (to help your body recover and nourish your gut lining), and
  • Digestive enzymes (to help break down food and make it easier to absorb).

I hope this helps and, of course, if you want to connect with one of our coaches on the next best step for you, reach out to coaching@lt.life.

 

In health, Anika Christ – Director – Digital Programming & Events – Life Time Weight Loss

 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader.

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Souping is the New Juicing – Articles

everything that makes it easier to live a healthy life is a good thing. And it just so happens that one of the top food trends for 2018, drinkable soups, aka souping, does just that. And a lot of health and fitness professionals these days are suggesting it over juicing. But does that mean it’s healthier?

Well, there are always two sides to a story and sometimes there’s not a definitive answer, especially with nutrition because we are all so unique. Here’s why we are currently loving this trend — and you can make up your own mind.

 

1. MAKES ON-THE-GO EATING HEALTHIER

It’s usually when we’re lacking time that we opt for something that’s processed and full of sugar, so having healthy options when we find ourselves in a rush is critical. Drinkable soups can be a nice option for a quick refuel. Plus, they make getting in those veggies so much easier; if there is one food group person have trouble getting in, it’s veggies.

This doesn’t mean we suggest eating on the go all the time as a way of life, because there are so many added health benefits to sitting without distraction and mindfully enjoying your meal with friends and family. But sometimes you have no choice but to eat at your desk or in the car. And at those times, you have to do the best you can to take care of yourself. So if you can make your on-the-go meals healthier, that’s half the battle.

2. LESS SUGAR + MORE FIBER

Did you know that a typical juice can have as much sugar as a soft drink? Granted, many juices are now trying to add more veggies, and if you’re getting fresh juice these are natural sugars. But we still want to keep an eye on natural sugar content, which will help to keep cravings at bay. In comparison, a drinkable soup generally has a low sugar content; for example, the recipes below each have only 3 grams. And because drinkable soups are generally made with whole veggies, you’ll get plenty of fiber which has so many benefits, including keeping you full longer and improving your gut health. 

3. SAVORY + SATISFYING

Although a fresh juice is super refreshing, a drinkable soup is really satisfying. And during this time of year when it’s cold you can drink it warm, or in the summer opt to drink it chilled. You can also easily add in foods that will balance out your macronutrients, like coconut oil or bone broth for healthy fat, and chickpeas for a plant-based protein which will keep you satisfied longer – so you won’t get “hangry.”

Want to try souping? These 2 recipes will get you started, but we also suggest that you make up your own concoctions. And if you’re loving what you’ve come up with, feel free to share them with us at coaching@lt.life.

 

CAULIFLOWER, CURRY & CASHEW SOUP

Prep time: 15 minutes
Total time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 bag frozen cauliflower or 1 small head cauliflower, broken into florets
  • 1 Tbsp. olive, avocado or coconut oil
  • 2 cups unsweetened cashew milk
  • ¾ cup cashews, soaked overnight in water, then drained
  • 1 tsp. garam masala
  • ¼ tsp. cinnamon
  • Sea salt to taste

Method

  1. On a sheet pan, lay out cauliflower and drizzle with oil. Roast at 400 degrees for 20 minutes or until slightly browned.
  2. In the jar of a high-speed blender, add the roasted cauliflower mixture, cashew milk, cashews and spices. 
  3. Blend until smooth. Serve and enjoy!

Servings 4 | Calories 180 | Sugar 3g | Fat 13g | Carbs 10g | Fiber 3g | Protein 6g

 

CREAMY BROCCOLI-AVOCADO SOUP

Prep time: 15 minutes
Total time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 cups broccoli florets
  • ¾ cup green peas
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 avocado, pit and skin removed
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • Sea salt to taste

 Method

  • Combine broccoli and peas in vegetable broth in a medium pot over medium heat, and heat to boiling. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes or until broccoli and peas are tender.
  • In the jar of a high-speed blender, add the vegetable mixture, avocado, lemon and sea salt.
  • Blend until smooth. Serve and enjoy!

 Servings 4 | Calories 140 | Sugar 3g | Fat 5g | Carbs 12g | Fiber 5g | Protein 4g

 

Written by LTWL Staff and recipes by Hanna Grinaker, Corporate Registered Dietitian–Life Time Weight Loss 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader. 

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Is Your Gut Health Impacting Your Metabolism and Mood? – Articles

When feeling grumpy, down, irritable or otherwise in a “bad mood,” it’s easy to consider the cause purely circumstantial: tossing and turning all night, needy family members, never-ending work demands, getting cut off on the expressway — or a combination of all of the above. While these are all undoubtedly frustrating, it’s not often that we stop and think about our mood in relation to what is going on inside our body. Specifically, the gut.

If you’ve ever had butterflies in your stomach before a presentation or had to rush to the nearest bathroom during a stressful event, it’s probably no surprise that the gut and brain are intricately connected. Intuitively, most of us are aware that a mind-body connection exists, and yet it’s often hard to actualize that concept in our own lives. Instead of considering internal health when feeling down or having anxious feelings, the common societal stance is to charge forward, taking a mind-over-matter approach.

However, it seems that almost daily, new and exciting scientific literature unveils the surprising impact of digestive health on our mood. Consider the facts: an approximated 70 million of us have some sort of digestive disorder (and even more than that likely have some sort of imbalance), one in six of us have some form of mental illness (major depression being the most common), one in three of us will have anxiety at some point with one in five having it within the last year.1,2,3 To be clear: anxiety, depression and other mental disorders are serious medical issues that should not be confused with simply having a bad mood or a bad day. But these struggles can significantly impact our relationships and quality of life. And if you’re struggling, it’s safe to say that you’re not alone. Whether you are fighting the battle with a medical diagnosis or struggling with ongoing irritability or apathy, let’s pause and consider what steps can be taken to support gut health and set the stage for a healthy mind.

 

GUT CHECK: THE BASICS

Our digestive tract is very much at the foundation of our overall health. Consider its importance. This long, hollow tube that starts with our mouth and ends, well, at the other end, is responsible for breaking down what we eat and drink, discerning what is actual nourishment (to be absorbed) and what is waste (to be passed through for eventual elimination). In addition, it has a gargantuan role in immunity and protecting us from the pathogens we ingest.

After chewing, food moves down the esophagus into the stomach, where acids and pepsin are released to get the food ready for the small intestine. The food progresses relatively slowly from the stomach into the small intestine, where along its approximate 20-foot length, enzymes and bile are released to break food down into individual components for absorption. And ancillary organs, such as the liver, gall bladder and pancreas, also impact what happens on the journey of food through the small intestine. Assuming all is well, nutrients are absorbed while other components (waste, fiber, etc.) then move into the large intestine, where we house several pounds’ worth of symbiotic bacteria. In the large intestine, water is reabsorbed, forming solid waste to eliminate through the bowels. But what does this have to do with our brain?

 

LEAKY GUT, LEAKY BRAIN?

The gastrointestinal tract, or GI tract, is connected to our central nervous system and brain, and our gut hormones have an impact on the function of our blood-brain barrier.4 This barrier is an important filter, and is largely responsible for protecting brain function from chemicals that would otherwise pass through and cause damage.

Our small intestine lining plays a big role in determining what gets absorbed and what passes through. Think of it as a bouncer at a nightclub; it should let “in” (absorb) the nutrients needed for us to feel good and function well, while keeping “out” (retaining in the GI tract) undigested food particles, pathogens and toxins. When the lining is compromised by chronic, unmanaged stress; processed food products; underlying food sensitivities; or chronic use of certain medications, it can become too permeable, or leaky. This is referred to as “leaky gut” or “intestinal permeability” which can play a role in how we respond to outside stressors, such as work demands or getting cut off in traffic.5

Food reactions and sensitivities are a hot topic in nutrition circles right now, and for good reason. They can create havoc in the digestive tract, and in terms of mental health, an elimination diet approach could be one of many factors to consider when addressing aggression or antisocial behavior.6  While it may be considered a fad by many, a gluten-free trial, as well as a consideration of a dairy-free and soy-free diet, can be used to see how these particular foods impact an individual’s mental state (or not). Removing gluten, for example, has been shown to reduce schizophrenic symptoms in some patients.7 While avoiding traditional bread, pasta, cereal and other gluten-containing grains may seem daunting, the potential for symptomatic relief could make it well worth trying. Plus, with all the gluten-free alternatives and specialized restaurant menus, it’s easier today than ever to follow a gluten-free approach.

The integrity of our small intestine lining is also a significant determinant of how well we absorb and utilize vitamins and minerals. In the context of mood, this is especially important, as Vitamin B12, folate, zinc, selenium and more have all been implicated in mental health.8,9,10 Replenishing the status of these nutrients — not just from intake, but from absorption and utilization — is a non-negotiable in supporting a healthy mood.11 This is why nice nutrition coaches are often sticklers on the quality and form of supplementation that is used. For example, in the case of depression (and dementia too), getting folate from a methylated form (like methyltetrahydrafolate) versus the synthetic folic acid form is recommended. (Go check your multivitamin label!) 12 Also note, certain key nutrients like Vitamin B12 (which should be methylated in the “methylcobalamin” form) and zinc (which should be chelated versus the cheaper oxide form), rely on adequate levels of acids and enzymes to be properly broken down. (Note: Life Time’s full suite of Men’s, Women’s, Performance and Prenatal multivitamins all meet these standards.)

Many of us also have lower levels of enzymes and a hindered ability to break these nutrients down to prepare them for proper absorption for our bodies to actually use, even if we’re taking in the right forms and amounts. Many clients choose to implement digestive enzyme support at mealtime to get more nutrient bang for their buck from their nutrition and supplementation plan. If you struggle with mood challenges, take heed, as nutrient deficiencies (such as Vitamin B12) can more than double the risk of depressive symptoms in some person.13 Mind your nutrient intake and absorption, and your mood may thank you.

 

THE WAR WITHIN

Our gut also has what is called the enteric nervous system: its own system of nerves, often referred to as the “second brain.” It produces and uses neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, the “feel good” neurotransmitter. In fact, a staggering 90% of our serotonin is made in the gut.14 It also houses a large community of intestinal bacteria (which can be referred to as probiotics, gut flora or the gut microbiome) in the large intestine, or colon. And the gut has so much impact on metabolism that it’s considered to be an organ with 100 times the genetic material found in the human body.15 Not only do these bacteria have an impact on how many calories we extract and use from the foods we eat,16 but they also produce metabolically crucial nutrients and compounds such as Vitamin K, biotin and butyrate. In terms of our brain, an altered composition of gut flora, or having a pathogenic gut infection, can have significant implications. These range from associations with autism to cases of complete alleviation of psychiatric symptoms to antibiotic therapy that address gut imbalances.17,18

And while there are beneficial bacteria that we rely on, there are also harmful species to tame. Optimal brain health (and overall vitality) hinges on having a large diversity of the good guys, while keeping the bad bacteria and yeast in check. In fact, our bacterial balance can be a direct regulator of anxiety and depression.19  The not-so-beneficial bacteria, yeast and pathogens thrive on added sugar and produce their own waste and toxins, such as ammonia, which can actually create inflammation that impacts the brain and can lead to depressive symptoms.20 The good and protective bacteria, on the other hand, thrive on dietary fiber and prebiotics, which serve as food for the good probiotics. Focusing on fermented foods such as sauerkraut, kombucha, kim chi and fibrous vegetables, plus considering a probiotic supplement, can help the good bacteria flourish.

With that being said, some person report feeling worse when implementing fermented foods or foods higher in fiber. If you’re trying to optimize your gut bacteria and are feeling worse instead of better, it may be worth digging a little deeper. Gut bacteria, normally residing the large intestine, can sometimes overgrow up the digestive tract and into the small intestine. This is referred to as small intestine bacterial overgrowth, or SIBO, and is closely associated with IBS or irritable bowel syndrome.21

Those with SIBO often struggle with ongoing issues of bloating, diarrhea, constipation and excess gas. In the case of mental health, SIBO is important because an estimated 70–90% of IBS sufferers have some sort of mental disorder.22 SIBO cases often require medical treatment and a concurrent diet low in certain forms of carbohydrates that are easily fermentable by the bacteria in the small intestine. They are called FODMAPs, short for Fermentable Oligo, Di, Mono-saccharides and Polyols. And foods such as garlic, onion, apples and celery top the list of FODMAP offenders. In most cases, otherwise healthy FODMAPs are avoided for a course of several weeks while the underlying issue is addressed, and the bloating and abdominal discomfort from ingesting them is temporary and dose-dependent. If you decide to try a low FODMAP approach, and you observe a change in your digestive function, be sure to connect with a medical professional as there is likely something deeper going on.

 

SO, WHAT NEXT?

It goes without saying that approaching mood challenges and struggles is complex and multifaceted. It often requires a holistic, 360-degree approach including medical care, therapy, psychological support, lifestyle considerations, stress management tactics, nutrition approaches, regular exercise, and when necessary, psychiatric interventions and medication. With that said, loving on our gut can only be of potential benefit.

In the grand scheme of things, it may be worth implementing some simple steps. They may include a modified elimination diet trial, taking in the right forms and amounts of vitamins and minerals, supporting proper nutrient breakdown and absorption, and fostering a healthy balance of beneficial gut bacteria to monitor changes in mood and outlook. Doing so could be a game changer in not only overt digestive function, but also in helping to calm chronic inflammation, support healthy detoxification, and optimize neurotransmitter balance.

As always, we’re here to help if you have questions about nutrition approaches or need support. Contact us anytime at weightloss@lt.life.

 

In health, Samantha McKinney – Life Time Lab Testing Program Manager

 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader.

References:

  1. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/digestive-diseases
  2. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/mental-illness.shtml
  3. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/any-anxiety-disorder.shtml
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18486244?dopt=Abstract&holding=npg
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22483040?dopt=Abstract&holding=npg
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17433442
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16423158
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15671130
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16382189
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1873372
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17723028
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17900207
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10784463
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393509/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19481599?dopt=Abstract&holding=npg
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3601187/
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16157555
  18. https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/30/1/213/321784
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29134359
  20. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12693607
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15316000
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9075306

 

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10 Healthy Food Hacks – Articles

When you get that intense I-need-to-have-something-now feeling, what do you generally crave? Something salty or sweet? Fried or carb rich? Or maybe it’s an adult beverage (or two) at the end of the day?

Whatever your fix is (because we all have one), there are probably days when you don’t give in at all. But when the hankerings won’t subside — and yes, there are times we should indulge — sometimes the best option is to have healthier alternatives to satisfy them when they arise.

That’s why we want to share these 10 dietitian-approved recipes that will satiate *almost* any craving. 

 

1. COLLAGEN MOCKTAIL

There’s nothing wrong with a nightcap, but if you’re trying to opt for a non-alcoholic beverage choice, a mocktail is a nice option. And this one is less than 100 calories and contains 19 grams of protein. 

Ingredients

Method

  1. Add collagen and coconut milk to blender, blending until frothy.
  2. Top with chosen sparkling beverage.

Nutrition
Servings: 1 Calories: 91 Sugar: 0 Fat: 0 Carbs: 1 Fiber: 0 Protein: 19

 

2. COCONUT YOGURT

Yogurt can be a nice option for some person, unless you have a sensitivity to dairy. If you do, coconut yogurt is a perfect alternative and you can even make a batch at house.

Ingredients

 Method

  1. Pour room temperature coconut milk into a glass jar (I use a Ball jar) and cover with cheesecloth. I just cut a double-ply piece and use a rubber band to secure.
  2. Open the capsules of Life Time Fitness Multi Pro 30B and add to coconut milk and stir.
  3. Place jar on a shelf in your kitchen cabinet with a stable temperature.
  4. Leave in the cabinet for 24 hours (you can leave it up to 48 hours if you’d like a thicker consistency).
  5. Place in the refrigerator for 12 to 24 hours.
  6. Enjoy it plain without a sweetener, or you could add a little stevia or honey. It would be amazing with a little shaved fresh vanilla bean, too. Or maybe just some mashed raspberries to make your own fruit-on-the-bottom coconut yogurt.

 

3. RAW CACAO BROWNIE BITES

Who doesn’t crave a gooey chocolate brownie every now and again, right? But try this no-bake, no-added-sugar option. It’s one of our most popular recipes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pitted (about 8)
  • ¾ cup cashews
  • ¼ cup cacao powder
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Method

  1. Add dates to food processor until blended, then cashews (making sure not to blend too much or the mixture will become too oily – stop when you can still see speckles of cashew).
  2. Add the cacao and vanilla, and blend minimally to combine (will form a “ball” in food processor). It will be sticky, and this is ok.
  3. Use a tablespoon to measure and roll into 12 equal-sized balls (create brownie bites this way or use a mold of choice) or line an 8×8 pan with parchment paper and spread the mixture equally, and lay an additional piece of parchment over to smooth out surface.
  4. Freeze for 1 hour. If using a pan, cut into 12 equal-sized pieces.
  5. Keep frozen or refrigerate.

Servings: 12 | Calories: 70 | Sugar: 6g | Fat: 3g | Carbs: 9g | Fiber: 1g | Protein:2g

 

4. ZOODLES

Although nice for carb loading, pasta is not always an ideal choice when you’re watching what you eat or have a gluten sensitivity. A super amazing option is to go with spiralized veggies, like zucchini. You won’t go into a carb coma after eating them and you’ll get in plenty of veggies, too.

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp. coconut oil, divided
  • 2 Tbsp. onion, finely minced
  • 1 lb. chicken, diced
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan (plus more for topping)
  • ½ cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. ground pepper
  • 2 medium zucchinis, spiralized
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree

Method

  1. In a medium saucepan, heat 2 Tbsp. of the oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring frequently, until it becomes translucent, 2 to 4 minutes.
  2. Add diced chicken and sauté until fully cooked, about 5 to 7 minutes.
  3. Stir in pumpkin puree, vanilla and grated Parmesan until well combined and smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut milk until well combined. Season with additional salt and pepper, if desired.
  4. In a large sauté pan, heat remaining oil over medium heat until just hot. Stir in spiralized zucchini and cook, tossing frequently, until just tender.
  5. Divide zucchini noodles among four plates. Top with pumpkin puree, shredded Parmesan, salt and pepper, and enjoy!

Nutrition
Servings: 3 | Calories: 270 | Fat: 18.5 | Carbs: 5 | Protein: 24 

 

5. FAUX-TATOES WITH GHEE

Mashed potatoes, the holiday fave, is totally a comfort food, but if you’re watching your carbs it’s not ideal. If you haven’t tried this recipe, give it a go and top it with a little ghee. You can thank us later.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups finely chopped cauliflower (about one small head)
  • 2 Tbsp. ghee or olive oil
  • ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ¼ cup hummus
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • ¼ cup green onion, chopped

Method

  1. Steam chopped cauliflower until easily pierced with fork (about 10 to 12 minutes).
  2. Take the steamer basket off the pot and place on towel for a minute to drain off excess water.
  3. Process all ingredients except green onion in food processor or blender until well combined.
  4. Season to taste and garnish with green onion.

Nutrition
Servings: 4 Calories: 150 Sugar: 5g Fat: 9g Carbs: 6g Fiber: 6g Protein: 6g

 

6. NICE CREAM

Ice cream is one of the simple pleasures of summer, but it doesn’t always fit into our healthy eating plan — well, at least not every day. Try this fruity option. We call it nice cream.

Ingredients

  • 1 frozen banana, cut into 1-inch slices
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened almond milk or coconut milk Method

Method

  1. First, choose only a ripe banana. Peel the banana, cut into pieces, and freeze for at least 6 hours or until fully frozen.
  2. For one serving, toss the banana into a high-quality blender or food processor and blend on low, adding liquid and sea salt until you reach your desired consistency.
  3. Once fully incorporated and smooth, you can eat it immediately or scoop it into a container and freeze until ready to eat!

Nutrition
Servings: 1 | Calories: 101 | Sugar 12g | Carbs: 23g | Fat: 1g | Protein: 1g

 

7. CAFE MOCHA SHAKE

We love our coffee, but every once in a while if you’ve been overdoing it, taking a little break isn’t a bad thing. And this is a really good alternative.

Ingredients 

Method 

  1.  Add all ingredients to a blender bottle and shake. 
  2. Add more ice and water, if desired.

Nutrition
Servings: 1 Calories: 145 Sugar: 4g Fat: 3g Carbs: 10g Fiber: 1g Protein: 20g

 

8. CARROT FRIES

Salt, fat and carbs . . . French fries are the perfect combination to satisfy the taste buds, but not the scale. Try this beta carotene-rich substitute. You might be surprised at how amazing they are. And while you’re at it, give a nod to the French and dip them in a little avocado mayo.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. carrots, peeled and cut into long strips
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
  • Sea salt and black pepper to taste

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a medium-sized bowl, combine carrots and olive oil, and toss to coat. Lay out evenly on a 9×13 cookie sheet and season with paprika, salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Bake for 30 minutes or until browned.
  4. Serve with guacamole, hummus or ketchup.

Nutrition
Servings: 4 Calories: 170 Sugar: 6g Fat: 13g Carbs: 14g Fiber: 6g Protein: 2g

 

9. ALMOND BUTTER COOKIES

Peanut butter is not only a common allergy, but it is one of the foods we take out during our D.TOX program because it can cause inflammation. Try this easy-to-make and satisfying alternative.

Ingredients

Method

  1. Add nut butter and dates to a food processor until well blended.
  2. Add collagen and 1 teaspoon of the almond milk. Then add the second teaspoon (or skip if you prefer the consistency to be thicker).
  3. Use a tablespoon to measure each “cookie.” Then roll into balls and cross hatch with a fork.
  4. Eat as is or bake in the oven for 5 minutes at 350 degrees.
  5. Keep refrigerated.

Nutrition
Servings: 3 Calories: 221 Sugar: 19g Fat: 12g Carbs: 22g Fiber: 3g Protein: 12g 

 

10. CAULIFLOWER CRUST PIZZA

Who doesn’t like a little ‘za covered in cheese? Try this healthy alternative and you might not even miss your traditional gluten-based crust.

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 3 cups riced cauliflower
  • 2 eggs 
  • 1/3 cup oat flour
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 tsp. oregano 

Toppings:

  • 3/4 cup low-sugar pizza sauce (or make your own with tomato paste, Italian spice and coconut oil)
  • 1/4 cup sliced black and/or green olives
  • 1/4 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 1 tsp. dried basil
  • 1/4 cup non-dairy cheese (optional)

Method

  1.  Preheat oven to 450 degrees and spray/grease 9×15 baking sheet or pizza stone.  
  2. Combine crust ingredients in the base of a high powdered blender and pulse until well combined. Pat out into circular shape on baking sheet and bake for 25 minutes.
  3. Add topping ingredients and bake for an additional 8 minutes. 

Nutrition
​​​​​​​Servings: 2 | Calories: 255 | Fat: 11g | Sugar: 9g | Carbs: 29g | Fiber: 7g | Protein: 13g

 

Written by LTWL Staff and recipes by Hanna Grinaker, Corporate Registered Dietitian–Life Time Weight Loss

 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader. 

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The 3 Best Anti-aging Workouts – Articles

You may be at a place in life where you’re feeling like, “How did I get here? And how can I possibly gain back what I once had?” Or maybe you’re just starting to experience what your future may hold if you don’t change things up and implement healthy habits.

Best-case scenario is that you’re proactively reading this to learn what you can start doing today to reap benefits for decades to come. Because, newsflash: after age 30, inactive individuals may begin to lose as much as 3 to 5 percent of muscle mass per decade, a condition known as sarcopenia.

Antiaging isn’t just about finding the best facial serum to help reduce the appearance of wrinkles, or the best abdominal crunches to beat the belly fat that came along on your recent year’s journey through life. Rather, antiaging is taking ownership of your health to ensure quality of life — and it can start at any age.

As a personal trainer, there are three specific workouts I suggest adding to your routine. They will not only reverse or prevent the effects of muscle loss, but will also keep your body and mind healthy, so you can continue to do what you love for as long as possible.  

1. H I I T

HIIT has been shown to be an effective way to exercise to aid in fat loss and improve athletic performance. And recent studies indicate it may also have antiaging benefits specifically related to our cells’ mitochondrial activity.

As we age, the mitochondria in our cells decline in activity. Mitochondria are the source of nearly 90 percent of the body’s energy needed to sustain organ function and life. However, factors such as toxins, low-grade inflammation and a poor diet may slowly make mitochondria dysfunctional. Why does this matter? Because this process may also then impact the capacity and size of your muscles, energy levels and your body’s ability to utilize sugar.

A Mayo Clinic study assessed two training groups (ages 18 to 30 and 65 to 80) and assigned three months of either HIIT, resistance training or a combination of the two. They learned that the typical decline in mitochondrial activity ceased, and even reversed in the group of older adults (65 to 80) that had completed the HIIT interval training.

In fact, it improved mitochondrial activity by 69% in the older adults group and 49% in the younger group.1 In other words, after HIIT, the 65- to 80-year-old group handled energy and functioned closer to the younger individuals’ cells.

Other studies on HIIT have shown its ability to improve fat mass, total body mass, trunk fat, and insulin resistance2 — all of which impact overall health and vitality.

Try out a HIIT workout this week and get in a nice workout in as little as 20 to 30 minutes. After a metabolic warm-up, sprint for 30 seconds and then walk for 60 seconds. Repeat 6 to 8 times, then properly cool down, stretch and refuel to aid recovery.

 

2. P I L A T E S 

As we age, some of the most common medical complaints are associated with osteoarthritis and pain in the lower back and neck. Pilates has been shown to help decrease back pain and improve physical ability when integrated into a training program. For example, after a 4-week Pilates program study, subjects with chronic low back pain between the ages of 20 and 55 years old, reported a significant decrease in their low-back pain and disability, which was maintained over a 12-month follow-up period.3

Designed by Joseph Pilates, this form of exercise originally helped to facilitate the recovery and strength of fellow internees during World War I. He believed that utilizing full, deep breaths and using the mind to control muscles in slow and controlled movements would not only improve physical health, but would also enhance energy and cognitive abilities by getting proper oxygen to the cells.

Pilates can be done on the mat or on an apparatus called, the reformer. Combining controlled movements along with special breathing techniques and concentration, Pilates helps to build long, lean muscles, and it has become a renowned favorite of person of all ages and abilities.

Pilates is also preventative, as it works to realign the spine and correct muscular imbalances throughout the body, developing a body less prone to injury. Teaching control of the body paired with balance, Pilates benefits many other areas in life aside from just physical strength, coordination and flexibility. It is a complete body-and-mind experience that may also help to relieve stress and improve mood. 

The growing evidence helps show that this unique style of exercise may serve as a phenomenal option to help increase muscular strength and stability for a wide range of ages and abilities. If you’re looking for a fun and different type of exercise, definitely give Pilates a try. For more information on how to get started, click here.

 

3. R E S I S T A N C E  T R A I N I N G

We’re told from a young age to drink more milk to help build strong bones, yet rarely is resistence training — one of the best methods of increasing bone strength — recommended to us (especially as we age). 

Peak bone mass is achieved in our late adolescent years, proving the importance of maintaining and optimizing it throughout adulthood. Weight-bearing exercise that places stress on bone (e.g., strength training) triggers our body’s natural response to help form additional bone, a process referred to as bone remodeling.4 One research study demonstrated a 9 percent increase in spinal bone mass in postmenopausal women after a yearlong strength-training program. In addition, the women who did not participant in strength training (the control group) experienced a decrease in bone density.5

We’ve all heard the saying, “Use it or lose it.” This study is a prime example, and it brings to life the importance of resistance training, specifically in regard to bone mass. Similarly, as your muscles get weaker and smaller, your bones and joints have less support which may lead not only to a decline in strength, but also becoming more prone to injury.

Putting stress on your muscles (via resistance training) signals the body to recover and repair the miniscule (positive damage), then rebuild and become stronger. This cyclical process prepares our muscles for future stressors, specifically when we’re relying on our strength in times of need (e.g., getting ourselves up from a fall).

Resistance training doesn’t necessarily have to include a full-blown session at your club. For many, the ease of getting an efficient workout in at house is more realistic some days. I personally look forward to my gym workouts; however, lately I’ve been following an at-house workout program to help ensure I’m getting in a few resistance training workouts throughout the week. While my sons can, at times, add a bit of time onto the workout session, having them join in on or watch mama’s “exercises” gives me that much more of a good-mood boost.

There are many different programs you can follow to incorporate resistance training into your routine, whether it’s 1:1 personal training, group training or virtual programs like Lean + Tone. Contact us at any time to learn more at weightloss@lt.life.

R E T H I N K   A N T I A G I N G

Rethink what “antiaging” is for you and try a few new workouts that can yield a slew of health and fitness benefits. Hopefully you’ll feel more empowered and view exercise as a way to “be more” (more fit, more healthy, more powerful) versus a way to “be less” (weigh less, take up less space, etc.), which is all too common in health and fitness goals.

 

In health, Becca Hurt — Assistant Program Manager — Life Time Weight Loss 

 

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader.  

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Do You Really Need To Take a Multivitamin?  – Articles

 

According to a report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “No U.S. state is meeting national objectives for consumption of fruits and vegetables.”[i]

Another government-funded study concluded that over 80 percent of adults fail to meet daily produce recommendations meant to guide us toward vitamin and mineral adequacy. [ii]

In addition, a study published in The Journal of Nutrition found that “Nearly the entire US population consumes a diet that is not on par with the recommendations.”[iii]

It seems there’s a consistent conclusion you can draw about the nutrient density of most U.S. adults’ diets; the majority of us are failing at nutrition.

And that’s not a very good situation to be in.

Based on the above research conclusions, one would assume that recommending multivitamins to our undernourished populations would be a high priority for most health experts.

However, there are enough well-publicized studies that question the need for multivitamins in the general population.[iv],[v] Also, these studies failed to show that multivitamins can prevent heart attacks or cancer, which are complex, multi-factorial diseases.  

Unfortunately, what doesn’t make the headlines is that these large studies are also riddled with serious limitations: low compliance, inconsistent quality and dosages of the multivitamins taken, and sky-high dropout rates — to name a few. So, you could argue that these studies fail to determine if there are other benefits to taking multivitamins.

Although the media often suggests that supplements are a dirty, uncontrolled, corrupt industry that wastes our money and threatens our health, this simply isn’t the case.

The FDA does have regulatory authority over supplement manufacturers and products.[vi] Plus, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has authority over how dietary supplements are marketed.

Compared to prescription drugs, dietary supplements appear to be quite safe.

Adverse reactions from prescription drugs (that are properly prescribed and properly administered) cause about 106,000 deaths per year according to one report in The Journal of the American Medical Association. While annual reports from the last several years compiled by the American Association of Poison Control Centers don’t even list the broad category “vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids, and other supplements” in the top 25 categories associated with fatalities. 

When you consider all the factors, the potential benefits of taking multivitamins far outweigh the risks for the general population.  

As one group of researchers investigating multivitamin use concluded, “[there’s] moderate to strong evidence to suggest a multivitamin should be considered to improve micronutrient status, enhance cognition, memory, anxiety, stress or depression.”[vii]

So, if you’re like most adults these days, you should probably take your vitamins — even if you try to eat better than the average person.

 

YOU NEED NUTRIENTS, NOT JUST CALORIES.

As our metabolism churns along burning calories, or as we try our very best to exercise away those last few bites of dessert, we have vitamins and minerals to thank for making it all possible.

Vitamins and minerals are the metabolic co-factors and co-enzymes that make human metabolism possible. Without them, normal biological function becomes impossible.[viii]

Without adequate vitamin and mineral status, our metabolic health (and overall health) can start to suffer in several different ways.

“Inadequate micronutrient intake, sometimes at borderline levels of deficiency, has been linked to stunted growth and neurocognitive deficits, as well as increased risks of various symptoms and [health] conditions. Most nutrients act in all tissues, and all tissues need all nutrients; therefore, inadequate intakes may adversely affect every body system.”[ix]

In other words, being undernourished may negatively impact every system in your body.

A few studies have explored what happens to our metabolic health when we get in a more consistent nutrient intake by supplementing with multivitamins. And a whole lot of things get better, metabolically speaking.

Getting adequate micronutrients appears to support whole-body energy metabolism, blood flow, resting energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and might even be enough to promote weight loss, fat loss, more normal glucose sensitivity, and improved cholesterol profiles.[x],[vi]

Do you exercise, or are you trying to restrict calories to lose weight? Do you live a demanding lifestyle, or lack nutrient density in your diet (hint, most person do)? Or do you drink alcohol regularly or take certain medications? If you answered yes to any of the above, you’re at risk for a number of nutrient insufficiencies or deficiencies.

Active individuals burn more energy and inflict more metabolic and mechanical stress on their bodies, so they have considerably higher calorie and micronutrient needs,[xii] which means if you exercise, you need more nutrition. Period.

In other words, if you fall into the categories above, the Recommended Dietary Allowances don’t apply to you. You need to fill in nutrient gaps with supplements.

A nice place to start is a multivitamin. It’s possibly the easiest dietary upgrade to make for the most potential benefit. Even if you don’t “feel” it immediately, the benefits can be so subtle, that you won’t notice the difference until you stop taking the multivitamin for a week or so.

 

DON’T JUST TAKE A MULTI. TAKE A GOOD MULTI.

Many medical professionals and researchers are quick to lump all supplements into one giant category, which is misleading. Just as with any consumer good or consumable, there’s actually a wide range of quality when it comes to dietary supplements.

It just so happens that most supplements, especially multivitamins, are on the low-quality end of the spectrum. Very low quality. So low that most person are probably wasting money on their supplements. Here are the criteria that you should consider when looking for a quality multivitamin:

 

CHOOSE A MULTI FOR ACTIVE person + AM/PM NEEDS.

As mentioned above, the Recommended Dietary Allowances are inadequate for most active adults. The established RDAs are meant to establish nutrient requirements that are adequate for most person to avoid deficiency. Avoiding deficiency (e.g., the bare minimum) and getting adequate levels to promote optimal health are quite different amounts for many nutrients.

This means that if you’re interested in nourishing your body to reach its peak performance potential, you should look for a multivitamin that supplies more than just the RDA for certain vitamins and minerals, especially if you haven’t always been as careful as you may be now about the quality of your food choices.

Since the body isn’t capable of getting all the nutrients it needs in one dose per day, it helps considerably if your multivitamin choice is split into multiple doses per day. Ideally, the formulas for each dose should be designed to deliver nutrients your body needs during that specific timeframe. This means your morning dose should support daytime energy production with higher doses of B vitamins and your evening dose should help promote restful, restorative sleep with relaxing minerals like magnesium.

 

CHOOSE A MULTI THE BODY CAN EASILY ABSORB + UTILIZE.

Think about this; would you buy cheap, ineffective brakes made out of the wrong materials for your car? I didn’t think so.

Why would you bargain shop for a supplement you’re going to put in your body that contains synthetic ingredient forms your body can’t readily absorb and utilize?

The majority of multivitamins sold today — including the “high-end” formulas promoted by all the major multilevel marketing supplement juggernauts — use synthetic vitamin forms and non-chelated (pronounced: key-lated) mineral forms that our bodies cannot easily absorb or readily utilize in our metabolism.

One of the easiest ways to spot an inferior formula is to check the form of vitamin B9, or folate, used. The synthetic form, folic acid, is virtually worthless and potentially harmful to many person who genetically lack the ability to convert synthetic folic acid into the metabolically active methyl-folate form (often listed as “5-methyl-tetrahydrofolic acid glucosamine salt”).

This particular issue is rather concerning since synthetic folic acid is also used in our food supply to fortify cereals, grains and formulas — and un-metabolized folic acid can build up in our system and interfere with normal folate metabolism for years.[xiii]

Another easy way to avoid cheap ingredient forms is to look for “chelated” minerals. Like methylated folate and methylated B-vitamins, chelated minerals are more readily absorbed and utilized by our bodies.[xiv] Chelated minerals also cost considerably more, but that’s beside the point if your first concern is choosing an effective formula.

Check your vitamin cabinet with these simple ingredient screening steps, and I’ll bet you’ll be surprised to find that you’ve been pinching pennies in the wrong areas of your health regimen.

 

USE A FORMULA THAT’S EASILY DIGESTIBLE.

Aside from being formulated with cheap, ineffective ingredients, most daily tablet multivitamins and gummy vitamins further interfere with how effectively the formula can support your health.

The explosive popularity of adult gummy vitamins is perhaps one of the most brilliant (and disturbing) money-making schemes the dietary supplements industry has hatched in decades. Gummies are fun and brightly colored, and they made it “trendy” to take your vitamins again. However, gummies are notorious for being limited to very low-potency formulas (e.g., fewer nutrients per dose), and also use unnecessary added sugars, artificial colors and synthetic flavorings. Plus, the gelatin used to form the gummy is very difficult to digest.

All of these factors mean that person are paying more money for gummies, buying them more frequently (because they take them more consistently than other forms) and are getting fewer usable nutrients. If you were to formulate a gummy vitamin capable of supporting the nutrient needs of an active adult, it would be about the size of a tennis ball, maybe bigger.

Compressed tablets are the most popular multivitamin delivery form, and have been around for several decades. They’re easy to produce, easy to take, and easy to make money on. Manufacturers press together cheap, synthetic vitamins and inorganic minerals with the help of binders, fillers, glues and coatings.

Next to gummies, hard-pressed tablet vitamins look like the easy alternative to save a few more dollars each month on maintaining health — if you have an iron stomach. Multivitamin tablets are known for being very slow to break down in the digestive tract (if they break down at all).

While compressed tablets seem to be a cheap, convenient way to supplement with a broad spectrum of vitamins and minerals, they just aren’t the most effective or well-tolerated way to get more adequate nutrients in your day.

The most stable and most easily digested delivery form is capsules. They look similar to tablets, but capsules are made of an airtight shell that delivers the formula to our system as loose, powdered nutrients. They don’t require heat or pressure to be made, so the nutrients in the formula aren’t subjected to any harsh conditions.

Capsules made from vegetable-based cellulose (hypromellose) are very well tolerated and break down in our gastrointestinal tract in a matter of minutes to allow nutrient dispersion and absorption.

One downside is that loose powder in a capsule takes up more space than a hard-pressed tablet, so it may require more “pills” per day. However, when we’re talking about delivering a multivitamin formula made to support the higher nutrient needs of active person, that’s not a disadvantage. Active person would need multiple “pills” anyway.

Liquid multivitamins are also available from a few manufacturers, and while they sound convenient, they are also more costly and less stable than capsule formulas. Many nutrients degrade when exposed to moisture and/or oxygen, which means liquid formulas quickly lose their potency once you open the bottle.

 

TESTED FOR PURITY, POTENCY + CONSISTENCY. 

This almost goes without saying, but you want to choose supplements you can trust. In this day and age, that’s getting more difficult. So many person shop around for the best deal and buy supplements from online retailers, not knowing that there are dozens of reports of fraudulent online sellers masquerading as real companies. They’re more interested in finding a bargain than finding an effective, high-quality formula.

The lack of trust in the dietary supplement industry is why Life Time set off to create its own products nearly 20 years ago. It’s the only way to have tight control of every aspect of ingredient selection, testing, formulation, production and finished goods testing.

There are companies that care about the purity, potency and consistency of their products, and Life Time invests a nice deal of energy in doing just that. With our manufacturing partners, we carefully evaluate each raw ingredient supplier, test and verify every batch of ingredients, closely monitor the production process, and verify our finished goods meet the specifications of our labels.

We will not compromise on quality controls when not only is our customers’ health on the line, but also ours.  

DON’T JUST SPEND MONEY. INVEST IN YOUR HEALTH.

If a supplement is cheap, it’s probably garbage. If a supplement company has a lot of attractive marketing, it’s safe to assume they’re investing in customer acquisition rather than high-quality ingredients in effective doses in the right delivery forms.

Look for multivitamin formulas designed for active, demanding lifestyles. Choose one with the right forms of vitamins and minerals. Invest in one you’ll actually be able to digest, absorb and utilize (capsules). If you have questions about where to start, connect with one of our fitness professionals to discuss how supplements fit into your health and fitness routine.

 

In health, Paul Kriegler, Registered Dietitian and Life Time Nutrition Program Development Manager.

This article is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations in this and other articles is at the choice and risk of the reader.  


[i] https://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2009/r090929.htm

[ii] http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6426a1.htm

[iii] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2937576/pdf/nut1401832.pdf

[iv] http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1767855

[v] http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1789253

[vi] https://www.fda.gov/Food/DietarySupplements/

[vii] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3823510/pdf/644.pdf

[viii] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2585731/pdf/559.pdf

[ix] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4109789/pdf/1475-2891-13-72.pdf

[x] https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo201014

[xi] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4750202/pdf/12986_2016_Article_71.pdf

[xii] http://www.sportsmed.theclinics.com/article/S0278-5919(06)00079-2/abstract

[xiii] http://www.quatrefolic.com/quatrefolic_vs_folic.php

[xiv] http://www.albionnutritionalfacts.com/

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